The Noso Rice Terraces in Kapangan

Noso Rice Terraces Kapangan Benguet Location Kintoman Variety Farm Harvest Season History Tribe Farming Mountain Beleng Belis Native Distance Kilometer Highway Barangay Province Layout Size Farmers The Noso Rice Terraces are located in Kapangan in Benguet Province. The Noso Rice Terraces are indigenous where native varieties of rice of the Kintoman variety are harvested. Noso Terraces adds beauty to the mountains of Beleng-Belis. The Noso Rice Terraces are located about 40 kilometers away from Baguio City; it can be reached via the Tublay-Kapangan road. From the barangay vehicle station, the Amlangit and Pekaw rice terraces is about 1.5 kilometers far while Noso rice terraces is about 500 meters away. Kapangan is located 29 kilometers (18 miles) away from the provincial capital of La Trinidad. Kapangan can be reached through the Acop-Kapangan-Kibungan National Road from Tublay or via the Halsema Highway to the Bakun-Kibungan-Kapangan Road. These roads all lead to Baguio City. Passing through the Continue reading

The Amlangit Rice Terraces in Kapangan

Amlangit Rice Terraces Kapangan Benguet Harvest Farm Kintoman Species Variety Season Size History Location Beleng Belis Mountain Baguio Kilometer Distance Scenery View Water Barangay Plantation Info The Amlangit Rice Terraces are located in Kapangan, in Benguet Province. The Amlangit Terraces are indigenous where the native varieties of rice, the Kintoman, are harvested. The Amlangit Terraces adds beauty to the mountains of Beleng-Belis. Amlangit Rice Terraces is located about 40 kilometers away from Baguio City; it can be reached via the Tublay-Kapangan road. From the barangay vehicle station, the Amlangit and Pekaw rice terraces is about 1.5 kilometers far while Noso rice terraces is about 500 meters away. Kapangan is located 29 kilometers (18 miles) away from the provincial capital of La Trinidad. Kapangan can be reached through the Acop-Kapangan-Kibungan National Road from Tublay or via the Halsema Highway to the Bakun-Kibungan-Kapangan Road. These roads all lead to Baguio City. Passing Continue reading

Ominio Rice

BarligThe Ominio variety is a medium grain, glutinous variety belonging to the rice genus Orysa sativa and to the race tropical japonica, also known as javanica. In the local Finallig language of the municipality of Barlig, Mountain Province, it is called Ominio. This variety is found throughout the province of Mountain Province and in adjacent Ifugao Province. In the municipality of Tadian, it is called ‘Balatinao’, while in Sadanga it is called ‘Kotinao’. In the Cordillera regional language of Ilocano, the broad linguistic term for glutinous/sticky rice is ‘diket’. In Mountain Province, ‘Chekat’ is their broad linguistic term for the glutinous rice. In the Ifugao language, it is ‘daya’ot/dayakkot’ and in Kalinga it is Continue reading

Jeykot Sticky Rice of Kalinga

Rice TerracesIn the Kalinga dialect, red sticky rice is known by a common name, and the spellings vary according to different dialects: jeykot or chaycot in Pasil, jekot in Lubuagan. This generic term refers to a medium grain glutinous variety belonging to the rice species Orysa sativa japonica. This plump red variety has a salmon colored bran on top of a milky white grain. It is the preferred sticky rice grown in the municipalities of Lubuagan and Pasil, Kalinga, Philippines. The plant has varieties that are both with and without awns. Awns are the beard-like bristly appendage on the end of the compound flowers. Lachok refers to the brown khaki hull variety with short awns. Jumalling refers to the light brown hull with 2 – 3 black stripes and no awns. Continue reading

Ingudpur Rice

Ifugao diketIngudpur (Oryza sativa tropical japonica) is also called Ifugao diket in the regional Ilokano language (dicket means “sticky”) and by other names in neighboring areas. It is one of the rarest sticky rice varieties in the province of Ifugao, on the island of Luzon in the northern Philippines. This type of sticky or glutinous rice is a medium sized grain grown in small terraced paddies in Cordillera, thriving at an elevation of 700 meters above sea level. The plants grow 125 cm tall and the rice has unique bi-colored bran, a mixture of black and brown, covering a milky white grain.  While Ingudpur looks similar to other traditional varieties, it has distinctive characteristics during its flowering stage. It produces the strongest aroma, and so birds flock to this variety. Farmers must watch their crops closely during this period if they wish to have any rice leftover to harvest. It is also considered among the Continue reading

The Luinab Rice Terraces in Jagna

The Luinab Rice Terraces BoholLuinab Rice Terraces are located in Jagna, Bohol province. Occupying a total land area of fifty hectares, the rice terraces are carved out from two mountains and is very picturesque especially a few months after the planting season when more shoots have grown forming a verdant carpet that descend from the mountain tops. When the grains have ripened and the fields turned into a golden brown carpet, the effect is different yet still very beautiful to look at.

Imbuucan Rice

Imbu-an Rice TingluTinawon’, coming from the regional language Ilokano and literally meaning ‘once a year’, is the broad linguistic term and common name used for this medium grain staple rice. The specific variety of this nomination is called ‘Imbuucan’ in the Tawili language of the municipalities of Banaue and Hingyon, Ifugao Province. The municipality of Hingyon and the adjacent valleys that are located in the municipality of Banaue are the main production areas for the exported rice. The municipality of Hingyon was divided off from the municipality of Banaue in 1982, but historically, the people are of the same enthno-linguistic group. Based on morphology, ‘imbuucan’ belongs to the rice genus and species Oryza sativa, subspecies tropical japonica (also known as javanica.) It is a slow growing staple variety that requires a 6-month growth period from transplanting to harvest. It is planted from December through Continue reading

Chong-ak Rice

Chong-ak RiceThe Chong-ak variety (species: Oryza sativa, subspecies: tropical japonica, also known as javanica) in the local Kalinga language is called ‘Unoy’ or ‘Uloy’, the broad linguistic term for this type of medium grain staple rice. In the province of Ifugao (local languages Ifugao and regional language Ilokano) the broad linguistic term for the subspecies tropical japonica is ‘Tinawon’, meaning ‘once a year’. The specific variety of this nomination is called ‘chong-ak’ in the Kalinga language of the municipality of Pasil, Kalinga. Pasil and the adjacent valleys located in the municipality of Lubuagan are the main production areas for the exported rice, but this variety is found throughout the three-province project area. The local name varies among Continue reading

Kahumayan Festival in Kapatagan

Kahumayan Festival Lanao del NorteThe Kahumayan Fetival is celebrated by the Kapataguenos in honor of the staple that has enriched the lives of many inhabitants in the vicinity of Kapatagan Valley. The festival gives acknowledgment to the rice farmers, stresses out the significance of rice, and aims in attaining the goal of the celebration, which is to enhance production and access to rice. For more than half of humanity, rice is the grain that has shaped that diet, culture and economics of billions of people around the world. For them, life without rice is simply unthinkable. Rice product, recipes, rituals and festivals have great significance in Continue reading

Puso (Hanging Rice)

Hanging RiceKnown as hanging rice in English, puso is a Cebuano delicacy that was considered as “food for the gods” during the pre-Spanish era. Requiring rituals in preparing, this kind of dish actually has a Malayan counterpart which is locally known as Ketupat.

Mainly consisting of rice and wrapped in coconut leaves, the method of cooking puso is through boiling. Each piece is strung together, cut off, and sliced in half before serving, thus called “hanging rice.” Normally, the coconut leaves used in wrapping the rice are in the shape of a diamond or heart, that’s why it has been called locally Continue reading