Manila Airport Map

Manila Airport Terminal 2

View and print the airport map of Manila International Airport (airport code MNL), locally known as the Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA). Find information on Arrivals, Departures, Airlines, Parking, Restaurants, ATM Machines, Currency Exchange, Ground Transportation, Wheelchair Assistance, Lost and Found, Hotel and Car Rental Information, Restrooms, and Baggage Claim for NAIA Terminal 1, Manila Airport Terminal 2, Domestic Terminal 3, and Ninoy Aquino International Airport Terminal 4. View the map below:

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Manila Airport Currency Exchange, Terminal 3

Money Airport Terminal 3 Money ChangersPassengers passing though the Manila International Airport (MNL – Ninoy Aquino International Airport) Terminal 3 can exchange their currency at that terminal. RCBC offers full banking service at the Arrivals area, where a money changer may also be located near the conveyor area. Two additional money changers are found at the Departures area, one near the check-in counters, and another near the Domestic Flights boarding gates. If you are looking for a money changer to exchange your dollars or other foreign currency into the local Philippine currency, the Philippine Peso, below is a list of banks with money changers at Terminal 2: Continue reading

China Airlines

China AirlinesChina Airlines offers direct flights between Manila, Philippines (MNL – Ninoy Aquino International Airport) and Taipei, Taiwan (TPE – Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport). Incoming and outgoing China Airlines flights at the Manila International Airport reside at Terminal 1. From their hub in Taipei, the airline operates flights to four continents including Asia, Europe, North America and Oceania. China Airlines has a strong presence in the Southeast Asia, East Asia, and Northeast Asia. Continue reading

Manila Airport Currency Exchange, Terminal 2

Manila Airport Money Exchange Terminal 2Passengers passing though the Manila International Airport (MNL – Ninoy Aquino International Airport) Terminal 2 can exchange their currency at that terminal. Both North and South Wings have money changer outlets. Banks at the departure level in both North and South wings, are located at the left-hand side of the Check-in Hall as you pass through initial security screening. As part of their regular service, all banks can change foreign currency.  If you are looking for a money changer to exchange your dollars or other foreign currency into the local Philippine currency, the Philippine Peso, below is a list of banks with money changers at NAIA Terminal 2: Continue reading

Manila Airport Currency Exchange, Terminal 1

Manila Airport Terminal 1 Banks Money ChangersInternational travelers passing though the Manila International Airport (MNL), locally known as Ninoy Aquino International Airport, will be arriving or departing from Terminal 1. For those unfamiliar with the local banks, the two largest and most reputable banks in the Philippines are BDO (Banco de Oro bank) and BPI (Bank of the Philippine Islands). If you are looking for a money changer to exchange your dollars or other foreign currency into the local Philippine currency, the Philippine Peso, below is a list of banks with money changers at the Terminal 1: Continue reading

Manila Domestic Airport Terminal

Manila Domestic Airport TerminalThe Manila Domestic Airport Terminal, also known as Terminal 4, hosts the operations of local carriers such as SEA Air and Zest Air. These airlines maintain ticketing offices around the immediate vicinity of the terminal. A one-level building, it is the oldest of all the terminals under the MIA system. The pre-departure area can seat nine hundred twenty-nine passengers, and several retail establishments within the terminal provide conveniences to passengers taking local flights. Continue reading

Manila Airport Terminal 4

Manila Domestic Airport TerminalThe Manila Domestic Airport Terminal, technically known as Terminal 4, hosts the operations of local carriers such as SEA Air and Zest Air. These airlines maintain ticketing offices around the immediate vicinity of the terminal. A one-level building, it is the oldest of all the terminals under the MIA system. The pre-departure area can seat nine hundred twenty-nine passengers, and several retail establishments within the terminal provide conveniences to passengers taking local flights. Continue reading

Manila Airport Terminal 3

Manila Airport Terminal 3In 1991, NAIA’s Terminal 1 reached its design capacity of 4.5 million passengers. As a result of annual passenger traffic growing at 9% per annum, the 1990 NAIA Master Plan crafted by Aeroport de Paris included a provision for a larger and modernized international passenger terminal.  While improvements raised Terminal 1’s design capacity to 6 million, a peak level of 7.7 million passengers was reached in 1997, causing overflow of passengers that year. Continue reading

Manila Airport Terminal 2

Manila Airport Terminal 2In order to address the continuing increase in the number of air passengers, the Manila International Airport Authority (MIAA) decided to construct a new terminal facility within the vicinity of the present Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA). This resulted in NAIA Terminal 2 which began operations in 1999. Originally envisioned as a domestic hub, the terminal now houses both the international and domestic operations of the country’s flag carrier, Philippine Airlines. Continue reading

Manila Airport Terminal 1

Manila Airport Terminal 1The Manila International Airport (the Ninoy Aquino International Airport), Terminal 1 was completed in 1981 to accommodate the country’s growing international passenger traffic levels during the 1970s. The 16-gate terminal currently services all international flights coming into Manila, except for those operated by Cebu Pacific, Air Philippines, Philippine Airlines and All Nippon Air.  Its 84 check-in counters and 22 immigration stations process the daily stream of passengers departing for various worldwide ports, while 20 immigration and 26 customs stations speed up the flow of arriving travellers. Continue reading