Tayabas Aytas

TayabasThe Aytas are called Negritos for their dark skin and kinky hair. They landed on the archipelago more than 30,000 thousand years ago and are thought to be the earliest inhabitants of the Philippines. The Negritos share some physical features with African pygmy populations.

Nowadays, rare is the Ayta wearing traditional clothing: the bahag (loincloth) for men and wraparound skirts for women. They now use urban attire. Ayta women are skilled in weaving, plaiting, and producing household containers, rattan hammocks, Continue reading

Sorsogon Aytas

Sorsogon ProvinceThe Aytas are called Negritos for their dark skin and kinky hair. They landed on the archipelago more than 30,000 thousand years ago and are thought to be the earliest inhabitants of the Philippines. The Negritos share some physical features with African pygmy populations.

Nowadays, rare is the Ayta wearing traditional clothing: the bahag (loincloth) for men and wraparound skirts for women. They now use urban attire. Ayta women are skilled in weaving, plaiting, and producing household containers, rattan hammocks, and winnowing baskets of excellent quality. Continue reading

Mag-Indi Aytas

Zambales ProvinceThe Aytas are called Negritos for their dark skin and kinky hair. They landed on the archipelago more than 30,000 thousand years ago and are thought to be the earliest inhabitants of the Philippines. The Negritos share some physical features with African pygmy populations.

Nowadays, rare is the Ayta wearing traditional clothing: the bahag (loincloth) for men and wraparound skirts for women. They now use urban attire. Ayta women are skilled in weaving, plaiting, and producing household containers, rattan hammocks, and winnowing baskets of excellent quality. Continue reading

Mag-Anchi Aytas

Tarlac ProvinceThe Aytas are called Negritos for their dark skin and kinky hair. They landed on the archipelago more than 30,000 thousand years ago and are thought to be the earliest inhabitants of the Philippines. The Negritos share some physical features with African pygmy populations.

Nowadays, rare is the Ayta wearing traditional clothing: the bahag (loincloth) for men and wraparound skirts for women. They now use urban attire. Ayta women are skilled in weaving, plaiting, and producing household containers, rattan hammocks, and winnowing baskets of excellent quality. Continue reading

Bataan Aytas

Mariveles BataanThe Aytas are called Negritos for their dark skin and kinky hair. They landed on the archipelago more than 30,000 thousand years ago and are thought to be the earliest inhabitants of the Philippines. The Negritos share some physical features with African pygmy populations.

Nowadays, rare is the Ayta wearing traditional clothing: the bahag (loincloth) for men and wraparound skirts for women. They now use urban attire. Ayta women are skilled in Continue reading

Ambala Aytas

Zambales ProvinceThe Aytas are called Negritos for their dark skin and kinky hair. They landed on the archipelago more than 30,000 thousand years ago and are thought to be the earliest inhabitants of the Philippines. The Negritos share some physical features with African pygmy populations.

Nowadays, rare is the Ayta wearing traditional clothing: the bahag (loincloth) for men and wraparound skirts for women. They now use urban attire. Ayta women are skilled in weaving, plaiting, and producing household containers, rattan hammocks, and winnowing baskets of excellent quality. Nomadic Ayta build temporary settlements made of indigenous materials, such as forked sticks, palm or banana leaves, cogon, and bamboo.

The Ambala Aytas live in San Marcelino, Subic City, Olongapo, and Castillejos in Zambales; and Dinalupihan in Continue reading

Abellen Aytas

Tarlac ProvinceThe Aytas are called Negritos for their dark skin and kinky hair. They landed on the archipelago more than 30,000 thousand years ago and are thought to be the earliest inhabitants of the Philippines. The Negritos share some physical features with African pygmy populations.

Nowadays, rare is the Ayta wearing traditional clothing: the bahag (loincloth) for men and wraparound skirts for women. They now use urban attire. Ayta women are skilled in weaving, plaiting, and producing household containers, rattan hammocks, and winnowing baskets of excellent quality. Nomadic Ayta build temporary settlements made of Continue reading

Pudtol Attas

Apayao ProvinceThe few remaining Pudtol Attas live along the Abulog River in Pudtol, northeastern Apayao (CAR), south of Pamplona. Theirs is an Ibanag language, which is closely related to those of the Gaddang, Itawis, Agta, Yogad, Isneg, and Malaweg.

The Atta Pudtol share the province with the Isnegs, who comprise the majority ethnic group in Pudtol. The Atta Pudtol build their houses along rivers and waterways, where an abundance of protein-rich food is available.

Amganad Ifugao

Ifugao PeopleMention the word “Ifugao” and it immediately calls to mind the famous man-made Banaue Rice Terraces in northern Luzon, which has been included as one of the wonders of the world. In fact, the word Ifugao is said to have come from ipugo, which means “from the hill.” The tribes’ main source of living is agriculture because they are surrounded by mountain ranges. Each village is composed of 12 to 30 houses built near rice terraces and other agricultural resources.

Ifugao is one of the places in the Philippines that has not been influenced by the Spaniards; they did enter Ifugao territory but Continue reading

Pamplona Attas

Cagayan ProvinceThe Pamplona Attas live mainly in the Northwestern part of Cagayan. Their language, also called Northern Cagayan Negrito, is closely related to and mutually intelligible with the Ibanag language.